Benabik's Musings

Random Things From Here and There

233 notes

nprplays:

5 Things I Learned as the Internet’s Most Hated Person
(WARNING: Some NSFW language)

Hi. My name is Zoe, and I make weird video games with some degree of success (and make them playable for free, if you’re so inclined). My life is generally pretty uncomplicated, I guess, aside from the fact that a month ago the Internet decided to make me the center of a supposed global conspiracy. I made the mistake of dating a guy who would later go on to write a several-act manifesto about my alleged sex life and post it to every forum he could create a handle for. Normally, this would blow over with little more than a “whoa, check out THAT guy,” but since I work in an industry that has very strong feelings about women, it quickly mutated from a jilted ex’s revenge-porn to one of the most intense scandals in recent gaming history.

OK, so before the frothing calls of “this is only one side of the story, blah, blah,” here’s the short and skinny of it: It doesn’t matter whether or not you like Zoe Quinn, her game or agree with the things she was accused of by her ex. You can think she is the worst person in the world, the absolute worst. That’s fine, that is your opinion. However, nothing, I repeat NOTHING in this industry warrants death threats, doxxing and harassment. Period.
And if someone on the other side of this “movement” can write a legitimate, reasoned post without using all of the colorful expletives of a George Carlin routine, I’ll happily read it. I won’t agree with it, most likely, but I’ll read. You know what I won’t do? Threaten your life or your personal well being simply for disagreeing with your opnion, because that would be lame and childish.

nprplays:

5 Things I Learned as the Internet’s Most Hated Person

(WARNING: Some NSFW language)

Hi. My name is Zoe, and I make weird video games with some degree of success (and make them playable for free, if you’re so inclined). My life is generally pretty uncomplicated, I guess, aside from the fact that a month ago the Internet decided to make me the center of a supposed global conspiracy. I made the mistake of dating a guy who would later go on to write a several-act manifesto about my alleged sex life and post it to every forum he could create a handle for. Normally, this would blow over with little more than a “whoa, check out THAT guy,” but since I work in an industry that has very strong feelings about women, it quickly mutated from a jilted ex’s revenge-porn to one of the most intense scandals in recent gaming history.

OK, so before the frothing calls of “this is only one side of the story, blah, blah,” here’s the short and skinny of it: It doesn’t matter whether or not you like Zoe Quinn, her game or agree with the things she was accused of by her ex. You can think she is the worst person in the world, the absolute worst. That’s fine, that is your opinion. However, nothing, I repeat NOTHING in this industry warrants death threats, doxxing and harassment. Period.

And if someone on the other side of this “movement” can write a legitimate, reasoned post without using all of the colorful expletives of a George Carlin routine, I’ll happily read it. I won’t agree with it, most likely, but I’ll read. You know what I won’t do? Threaten your life or your personal well being simply for disagreeing with your opnion, because that would be lame and childish.



(via froborr)

43,555 notes

froborr:

philsandifer:

boyvstheworld:

Wonder Woman is my everything.

I tend to feel that, when done right, Wonder Woman should be as inspirational and utopian as Superman, and about twice as ruthless as Batman.

I would like to point out that there is a strong implication that Wonder Woman just punched that guy with the arm that had a bullet wound in the shoulder.

Wonder Woman sneers at pain.

Mostly she sneers at misogyny, of course, but also pain.

(I combined two versions of Froborr’s reblogs into one to grab all the bits I liked.)

(Source: monsieurdangereux)

8,066 notes

In general, I think we need to move away from the premise that being a good person is a fixed immutable characteristic and shift towards seeing being good as a practice. And it is a practice that we carry out by engaging with our imperfections. We need to shift towards thinking that being a good person is like being a clean person. Being a clean person is something you maintain and work on every day.We don’t assume ‘I am a clean person therefore I don’t need to brush my teeth.’ When someone suggests to us that we have something stuck in our teeth we don’t say to them ‘What do you mean I have something stuck in my teeth—but I’m a clean person?!’

Jay Smooth in his TED speech “how I learned to stop worrying and love discussing race” (via tropicanastasia)

Jay Smooth almost always a reblog

(via unrational)

Dude nailed it. We all need to work at being good. Even if we think we are.

(via jasmined)

(via froborr)

12 notes

itsbenedict:

HEY GUYS

So I’ve been meaning to rec this web novel for a while, and I figured now would be the perfect time to do that for, uh, no reason at all, actually, come to think of it. Definitely not because the author is offering to send a draft of the final chapter of the entire series a couple weeks early to anyone who posts a public recommendation. But if that were the case, then the fact that I’m hyped enough to want to bite at the offer would serve as a sign that it’s not the only reason I would recommend it. Okay? Cool.

SO

City of Angles is a web novel by Stefan Gagne about… well, it’s set in an eldritch Escher-style city where space is warped and twisted and buildings glitch in on themselves and connect at impossible angles and if you get lost you can wander endlessly until you lose your mind and become an impossible glitch monster yourself, which, I predict would appeal to a lot of you all by itself, but… it’s also really good and fun to read, which is an important consideration on top of how the setting is cool.

City of Angles is split into three books, with eight or nine chapters each. After the first two, each chapter is kind of like a self-contained short story featuring a different POV character and their development, culminating in a finale chapter that brings together all the hints and disconnected events from the others and using them to wrap up a main plot thread and solve a major mystery of the setting. It’s a really nice structure for reading through, with the end of each chapter being a natural stopping point.

Anyway, although the setting is super cool and there’s mysteries everywhere, the real focus is on the characters and their perspectives. The story has a message it wants to get across: live, exist, keep going. Not everybody does this for the same reasons, not everybody can do it as easily as everyone else. The ensemble cast and multitude of perspectives serve to to drive that point home. It’s sort of a story about diversity- all kinds of people can be strong. The setting lends itself to horror, but it’s ultimately a feel-good, optimistic story.

Other fun things:

  • Use of a trope that everybody hates, in a way that’s actually compelling and interesting and adds to the story
  • Skrillex is in it and gets mutated into a glitched-out abomination
  • QR codes
  • Hollister fucking Avenue, my man

Anyway read the thing, it’s super fun and good and bye guys I’m off to go read the ending early HAHAHAHAHA

I heartily enjoy all of twoflower’s work, and his newest is nearly complete and you should go read it.

252,000 notes

froborr:

rad-moves:

sassy-hook:

pleasant-trees:

aprilsvigil:

manticoreimaginary:

Watching this (and fearing broken ankles with each loop) I can’t helping thinking about that old quote Ginger Rogers did everything Fred Astaire did, except backwards and in high heels.

But no, if you watch closely you’ll see she doesn’t even step on the last chair. That means she had to trust that fucker to lift her gently to the ground while he was spinning down onto that chair. That takes major guts. I’d be pissing myself and fearing a broken neck if I were in her place. Kudos to her. 

I can’t stop watching this. 

#I watched this for too long to not reblog

I have no idea what this is/ who these people are but I just love the gif!

Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire, famous movie stars of the black-and-white era, known particularly for their dancing skill. Frequently cast together as male and female lead.

froborr:

rad-moves:

sassy-hook:

pleasant-trees:

aprilsvigil:

manticoreimaginary:

Watching this (and fearing broken ankles with each loop) I can’t helping thinking about that old quote Ginger Rogers did everything Fred Astaire did, except backwards and in high heels.

But no, if you watch closely you’ll see she doesn’t even step on the last chair. That means she had to trust that fucker to lift her gently to the ground while he was spinning down onto that chair. That takes major guts. I’d be pissing myself and fearing a broken neck if I were in her place. Kudos to her. 

I can’t stop watching this. 

I have no idea what this is/ who these people are but I just love the gif!

Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire, famous movie stars of the black-and-white era, known particularly for their dancing skill. Frequently cast together as male and female lead.

(Source: ohrobbybaby)