Benabik's Musings

Random Things From Here and There

1 note

When people think of “gamers,” I want them to think of Child’s Play, and athletes who play competitive League of Legends, and all the normalization we’ve accomplished over the years. I want them to think of feminism, and games as an art form — something more than mass entertainment. I want them to think of all the amazing things that video games have done, and can do, because that means we get to keep playing more games. But as long as you […] continue this asininity, they won’t, and it makes me want to pick you all up collectively and shake you […] because YOU’RE SO F[—]ING DUMB.
Why #Gamergaters Piss Me The F*** Off — The Cauldron — Medium (NSFW language, quote mildly edited…)

189,006 notes

froborr:

inachisasuke:

tamirthegreat:

therighthandofdoomcpn:

boxwithlid:

livid-righteousness-badgers:

justdaps:

nahchillhomebro:

summonermedirby:

I don’t think people give Flash enough credit.

…………….my goodness

He didn’t just rebuild an apartment building.

HE FUCKING LEARNED HOW TO BUILD AN APARTMENT BUILDING. HE DID FUCKING RESEARCH. IT TAKES SEVERAL GODDAMN YEARS TO LEARN ALL THE ENGINEERING AND LEGAL CONSTRAINTS OF BUILDING A FUCKING BUILDING AND JUST DID IT.

This is one of my favorite flash comics. It really highlights how the flash doesn’t just run really fast, but can do absolutely astounding things. I remember reading this for the first time and having my head explode. 

Flash rules.

Flash is actually really freaking awesome.

to quote Hal Jordan: “the fastest man alive was always late because he stopped to befriend the people he saved”

Barry Allen is a sweetheart

did he add fresh trees and a swing set?

Yes. Yes he did.

Because he’s the Flash.

(Source: ifuckinghatevideogames)

55,484 notes

froborr:

typette:

nadiaoxford:

evilsoutherngentleman:

megan-is-a-doll:

dorkly:

"Eye of the Tiger" Played on an Old Dot-Matrix Printer

"Papa, what did the ’80s sound like?"

I just laughed so hard I almost puked.

I am so glad I know you, and that people make things like this.

This is humanity’s most important achievement. 

someone make a fucking hardcore techno remix of this shit with a sick bass line and synths, DO IT

As a child thereof, I can confirm that this is indeed precisely what the 80s sounded like.

Wow. That sounds better than the floppy drive version.

72 notes

itswalky:

whoever decided to completely rebuild the read hall lobby IS NOT MY FRIEND

Hasn’t only a month passed in Dumbing of Age?  How fast do construction workers build in the dumbiverse?

itswalky:

whoever decided to completely rebuild the read hall lobby IS NOT MY FRIEND

Hasn’t only a month passed in Dumbing of Age? How fast do construction workers build in the dumbiverse?

7 notes

deathchrist2000 asked: Top 5 TAS episodes and why

froborr:

benabik:

froborr:

5. “Bem” It has some of the most bizarre and playful imagery of the series, plus it takes the recurring idea of the super-advanced alien secretly testing humanity and renders it utterly ridiculous in the best possible way.

4. “The Slaver Weapon” Subtly does more to darken and complicate the Federation than all of DS9 put together—it straightforwardly and without comment depicts the Federation as a civilization that responds to an aggressive weaker power by repeatedly stomping it militarily and imposing punitive sanctions, PLUS it implies that many of the Federation’s key technologies are NOT the product of scientific advance by Federation members but rather reverse-engineered from relics left behind by a brutally imperialistic dead civilization. So it turns the Prime Directive into a hollow, cynical joke as well (as it deserves).

3. “The Time Trap” Again, really shows off the inherent problems of a space empire that preaches peace and nonintervention, as the civilization inside the titular trap is a peaceful cooperative of many races that has banned all dissent. Plus it’s cool seeing Federation and Klingons reluctantly forced to work together, even if that’s undermined by the ending.

2. “The Magicks of Megas-Tu” Magic is real, Satan was a misunderstood good guy, and holy crap some of the visuals in this one. But mostly for having SATAN befriending the Enterprise crew—can you IMAGINE if somebody tried to air that on Saturday morning today? And I don’t mean a Satan-analogue or an alien that looks Satanic or something like that, I mean an immortal magical creature from outside the universe that is literally stated to be the being humans call Lucifer.

1. Look, anyone who doesn’t put “Yesteryear” on a Top 5 TAS list is just objectively wrong. This is the *the* Spock character piece par excellence. The only good bits of Into Darkness were cribbed directly from it. (Well, okay, not the “Live long and fuck you” bit, but the general way it depicts Spock’s childhood.) It’s an absolutely critical turning point in Spock’s character arc, the transition from a Vulcan struggling to repress his human side (as in the series) to a Vulcan-human hybrid trying to integrate his two sides (as in the movies).

Ask me asks!

"The Slaver Weapon" is particularly interesting because it’s an adaptation of Larry Niven’s "The Soft Weapon" from his Known Space universe, hence the addition of the Kzinti to the Star Trek universe. The Kzinti are, in some ways, better Klingons than Klingons, and their transition from a completely aggressive race to one that peacefully interacts with others is very interesting (I’m a big fan of the Man-Kzin Wars books. Although the Glastnost Klingons from VI are pretty good.)

The fact that the insane Puppeteer Nessus is replaced by Spock is pretty amusing to me.

TAS was fantastic and I haven’t seen it for many years. I should watch it again.

Yes, but part of what makes it so interesting as a TAS episode is the difference between Known Space and the Federation, which is that humans don’t have an interstellar empire in Known Space. There are human colonies, but they appear to be pretty much autonomous and all be on worlds without indigenous population (well, except Down, but humans didn’t *know* the grogs were sentient when they colonized, and appear to leave grog territory alone once they find out, and Jinx, where the human colonized an area uninhabitable by bandersnatchi and have a treaty in place that is honored by both sides). So the Man-Kzin Wars in Known Space are individually weak human nations (plural) banding together to defend themselves from the aggression of an imperial power.

The Man-Kzin Wars implied by the TAS episode, on the other hand, are two empires fighting, and the larger, more powerful, better organized one beating down the smaller and imposing harsh sanctions. Humanity comes out looking much worse in the Trek version than the Known Space version—and how bizarre a statement is that!

It just feels wrong that Roddenbury’s Federation is worse than Niven’s ARM. That’s… not right.

7 notes

deathchrist2000 asked: Top 5 TAS episodes and why

froborr:

5. “Bem” It has some of the most bizarre and playful imagery of the series, plus it takes the recurring idea of the super-advanced alien secretly testing humanity and renders it utterly ridiculous in the best possible way.

4. “The Slaver Weapon” Subtly does more to darken and complicate the Federation than all of DS9 put together—it straightforwardly and without comment depicts the Federation as a civilization that responds to an aggressive weaker power by repeatedly stomping it militarily and imposing punitive sanctions, PLUS it implies that many of the Federation’s key technologies are NOT the product of scientific advance by Federation members but rather reverse-engineered from relics left behind by a brutally imperialistic dead civilization. So it turns the Prime Directive into a hollow, cynical joke as well (as it deserves).

3. “The Time Trap” Again, really shows off the inherent problems of a space empire that preaches peace and nonintervention, as the civilization inside the titular trap is a peaceful cooperative of many races that has banned all dissent. Plus it’s cool seeing Federation and Klingons reluctantly forced to work together, even if that’s undermined by the ending.

2. “The Magicks of Megas-Tu” Magic is real, Satan was a misunderstood good guy, and holy crap some of the visuals in this one. But mostly for having SATAN befriending the Enterprise crew—can you IMAGINE if somebody tried to air that on Saturday morning today? And I don’t mean a Satan-analogue or an alien that looks Satanic or something like that, I mean an immortal magical creature from outside the universe that is literally stated to be the being humans call Lucifer.

1. Look, anyone who doesn’t put “Yesteryear” on a Top 5 TAS list is just objectively wrong. This is the *the* Spock character piece par excellence. The only good bits of Into Darkness were cribbed directly from it. (Well, okay, not the “Live long and fuck you” bit, but the general way it depicts Spock’s childhood.) It’s an absolutely critical turning point in Spock’s character arc, the transition from a Vulcan struggling to repress his human side (as in the series) to a Vulcan-human hybrid trying to integrate his two sides (as in the movies).

Ask me asks!

"The Slaver Weapon" is particularly interesting because it’s an adaptation of Larry Niven’s "The Soft Weapon" from his Known Space universe, hence the addition of the Kzinti to the Star Trek universe. The Kzinti are, in some ways, better Klingons than Klingons, and their transition from a completely aggressive race to one that peacefully interacts with others is very interesting (I’m a big fan of the Man-Kzin Wars books. Although the Glastnost Klingons from VI are pretty good.)

The fact that the insane Puppeteer Nessus is replaced by Spock is pretty amusing to me.

TAS was fantastic and I haven’t seen it for many years. I should watch it again.